Jason Duff
Jason Duff
VP, Design Engineering
 

Jason has more than 23 years of experience in the design, analysis and improvement of operations, systems and facilities. This includes analysis of production methods, equipment mix, plant and equipment layout, material handling, production schedules and resource utilization. His responsibilities include conceptual design, sizing and throughput analysis, feasibility studies, simulation, master site planning and selection, detailed design, specifications, vendor selection, contract management, and commissioning. Jason has worked on projects for Coca-Cola, Heinz, Kraft Foods, Nestlé, Sara Lee Foods and many others.

 

6 Ways You’ll Achieve Greater Speed to Market on Your Next Design-Build Food Project by Working With a Fully Integrated Firm

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6 Ways You’ll Achieve Greater Speed to Market on Your Next Design-Build Food Project by Working With a Fully Integrated Firm

We all know the design-build methodology, by nature, is faster than the traditional design-bid-build approach. But if speed to market is your goal (hint: if you’re in the food and beverage industry, it probably is), then you can’t beat the agility that a fully integrated firm offers.

We’ve previously explored how a fully integrated design-build firm — one that offers process design, building and infrastructure design, and construction services with all in-house resources — can save you money and increase your plant’s food safety. In this post, I’m going to discuss the numerous ways an integrated approach can streamline your next project and get you from concept to commissioning faster than any other method.

 

3 Ways an Integrated Design-Build Firm Can Improve the Food Safety of Your Next Food Manufacturing Facility

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3 ways an integrated design-build firm can improve the food safety of your next food manufacturing facility

Will your new food or beverage facility be the source of a future recall? The answer could all come down to communication. I’m not talking about how well your staff on the plant floor can work together or how effective your leadership skills are as an owner. The fate of your plant can be decided well before a big ribbon is cut and your processing lines whir to life.

The food safety quality of your next facility depends on whether the people designing and constructing your plant can communicate effectively.

This may feel like something that’s outside of your control — but who you hire can be the difference between a project with streamlined communication and a multi-million-dollar game of “telephone” where mixed messages put food safety (and your budget) at risk.

 

Why Your Expansion Plan Needs Supply Chain Modeling

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supply chain modeling

As the food processing industry continues to flourish, many manufacturers are faced with the need to increase capacity. Whether it’s adding a new process line, building an additional plant or expanding an existing facility, conducting a supply chain analysis in partnership with your design team can lead to better decision-making and more efficient capital expenditures.

 

Why an Integrated Approach is Crucial in Designing and Building Distribution Facilities

Distribution series

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iStock_000020964816MediumThe design and construction of a distribution warehouse is more complex than meets the eye. Industrial designers, architects, mechanical engineers, refrigeration experts and a thermal team all working together can lead to a more functional, efficient, and cost-effective facility. Working with multiple contractors in multiple locations increases the likelihood of miscommunication, competing workflows, and increased costs — in addition to a longer production schedule.

 

How Product, Product Mix and Production Volume Impact Design

Food Plant Design Series

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Preliminary discussions with your food processing plant architects should include a thorough discussion of your sales and marketing goals. Your plant’s specific products, product mixes (including future products), and production volume all impact decisions made during the design process.

 

Four Major Decisions That Impact the Design of Your Facility

Food Plant Design Series

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Post 1_steel constructionFood processing plant owners must answer a few key questions prior to the design of any facility:

1. Location – Plant owners often select a location that will be most efficient from a supply and demand standpoint, opting for sites that offer the best transportation access. Yet depending on the region of the country the plant will be located in, designers often must begin with a thorough analysis of weather issues and permitting issues related to that location. Are there seismic concerns that will dictate construction materials? Are there wind speed issues that may impact the building’s exterior and how piping is integrated into the building? Owners and engineers should work together to understand these issues, as these conditions will guide many decisions in the design process.

 

Considerations for On-site Wastewater Treatment

Design-Build Series

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Stellar often partners with The Probst Group on wastewater treatment projects. Hank Probst, a partner with The Probst Group, contributed to this blog post.

 

a wastewater treatment tank

a wastewater treatment tank

 

Reducing the costs of wastewater treatment spent at an outside facility is leading many food processing plants to consider treating their wastewater on-site. In addition to treatment costs based on volume, municipalities typically impose a surcharge if the characteristics of the wastewater stream exceed the municipality’s typical domestic strength. It becomes an ROI issue and fairly easy for plants to justify.