Following Sanitary Design Best Practices Key to Avoiding Food Safety Recalls

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BEST PRACTICES IN SANITARY DESIGN

Stellar is experiencing a major uptick in sanitary design projects, and we have a hunch as to why. The implementation of the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) has many food and beverage companies taking a deeper look at their processing practices, their plant designs and the equipment that goes inside their facilities. As food recalls litter the headlines and impact the health of consumers, food safety continues to be a crucial area of focus. A sound food safety program begins on the plant floor, and it all starts with following sanitary design best practices.

 

New Trends in Sanitary Equipment Design are Improving Food Safety Standards

Food safety series

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San Antonio Faciity -3As food safety regulatory requirements become more stringent, equipment manufacturers are stepping up to the plate and increasing the role they play in the industry. The American Meat Institute’s (AMI) 10 sanitary design principles offer baseline standards for equipment design, yet many suppliers are going above and beyond these standards by offering improved surfaces, cleaning chemicals, and construction processes.

 

New Food Safety Rules in the New Year

2014 trends and predictions

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FSMA
For the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA), 2014 will be a year of change. The President’s 2014 budget includes a request for $295.8 million allocated to the FDA’s food safety initiatives. According the FDA’s 2014 Congressional Budget Request, the agency’s priorities this year include:

 

Food Safety in China: What Food Processors Need to Know

Doing Business in China Series

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Food processing facilities in the U.S. have long made food safety one of their top priorities. Unfortunately that’s not the case in China. In recent years the country has been plagued with numerous high-profile food safety scandals, from grilled kebabs made from cat meat to pork buns so loaded with bacteria that they glow in the dark.

 

Five Ways to Ensure Your Food Safety Audit Goes Well

Food Safety Series

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Quality assurance is one key to a successful food safety audit

Quality assurance is one key to a successful food safety audit

 

The Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) expanded the FDA’s authority to regulate the conditions of food manufacturing facilities and how products are produced, manufactured, transported, imported and marketed in the United States. Food safety audits, whether conducted by an internal team or by an outside consultant, will ensure that your food processing plant is in full compliance with FDA regulations.

 

Food Processing Design: Five Steps for Integrating Food Safety Into Equipment Upgrades and Plant Renovations

Food Safety Series

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If you’re thinking of upgrading equipment or renovating your facility, it’s critical that food safety requirements are met in the process. Most manufacturers are taking a proactive role in ensuring equipment is engineered for optimal cleaning and sanitizing to meet all safety regulations, but it’s important that all plant stakeholders who play a role in food safety have input.

 

Food Plant Sanitation: Five Roles Your Employees Should Play in Food Safety

Food Safety Series

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Food processing engineers are frequently challenged with developing controls and processes for managing food safety precautions within a plant. Yet food safety is a role that every employee, from the top down, needs to embrace. It should be deeply rooted within the plant’s culture and most important, it should be a continuous improvement process.

 

Food Manufacturing Plant Design: Tips for Preventing Food Safety Issues

Food Safety Series

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Post 1 Heinz Sanitary Deck

An exemplary model for sanitary equipment design

 

One of the most common causes of food safety problems is a flaw in the sanitary design of food processing equipment. When building new facilities or installing new lines, many food manufacturers struggle with increasingly fast-paced project schedules and limited funds, which affect priorities assigned to sanitary equipment design and requirements during the early stages of a project.

 

The Food Facility Safety Double Standard: Keeping Your Maintenance Crew as Safe as Your Product

What updated OSHA standards mean for your facility’s roof and how to protect maintenance workers on your property

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The Facility Safety Double Standard: Is the Outside of Your Building as Safe as the Inside?

There’s a prevalent double standard when it comes to food facility safety management. Think about the measures taken when a visitor enters a food plant production area: You have to dress out, walk through a foot bath, take off jewelry, wear a smock. All of these precautions are designed to keep your product safe — but what about your maintenance crew?

It’s not uncommon to see safety standards and attention to cleanliness become more relaxed in maintenance areas or on the roof of a food plant. Food safety precautions get a lot of attention because owners (rightfully) fear product contamination and highly publicized recalls, but what about the risks outside your building? One maintenance or construction accident can do just as much damage in negative publicity and lawsuits as a product recall.

 

How to Design Your Food Plant for Worker Safety

4 preventative design measures to ensure personnel safety

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How to Design Your Food Plant for Worker Safety

Today, firms are “[designing] safety for each worker into every phase of every building project.” We’re addressing worker safety from the start—at the facility design phase—strategically designing plants with safety at the forefront. We call this “sustainable safety”: a strategy that unifies design and construction teams with owners and managers to identify potential hazards and integrate employee safety through design, products, services and educational programs.